BBC and UEFA should have cut filming after Christian Eriksen collapsed | Annie Lewis

On Saturday, Finland went head-to-head with Denmark in the Euro 2020 football tournament.

Tuesday, 15th June 2021, 4:48 pm
Denmark's midfielder Christian Eriksen runs during the UEFA EURO 2020 Group B football match between Denmark and Finland at the Parken Stadium in Copenhagen on June 12, 2021. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel / various sources / AFP) (Photo by FRIEDEMANN VOGEL/AFP via Getty Images)
Denmark's midfielder Christian Eriksen runs during the UEFA EURO 2020 Group B football match between Denmark and Finland at the Parken Stadium in Copenhagen on June 12, 2021. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel / various sources / AFP) (Photo by FRIEDEMANN VOGEL/AFP via Getty Images)

Just before half-time, Christian Eriksen – a former Tottenham Hotspur player who nows plays for Inter Milan – collapsed on the pitch at Parken Stadium.

Denmark's captain, Simon Kjaer, instantly ran over to him and appeared to clear Eriksen’s airways.

Almost simultaneously, the cameras zoomed in on Eriksen’s pale face and the Denmark team formed a human wall around him as medics arrived.

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What followed was a truly distressing watch as a 29-year-old dad, son and boyfriend fought for his life on the football pitch. With nearly 15,200 fans in attendance at and millions watching across the world, cameras continued to film fans, team mates and Eriksen’s family who were clearly in distress. Some were crying, some were praying.

I watched the scene unfurl in horror. Not only because of the shocking situation which was unravelling, but because it was being streamed live on TV.

I was disgusted when cameras focused on Eriksen’s girlfriend, crying into the shoulder of captain Kjaer as she was told the distressing news that her boyfriend was being given CPR. The cameras only cut to the studio when Eriksen was being stretchered off of the pitch.

Later that evening, it was confirmed Eriksen was in a stable condition, being treated in a Copenhagen hospital. Yesterday, (June 15) Eriksen posted on Instagram thanking his fans for their well-wishes and said ‘I’m fine – under the circumstances’.

The live scenes which were broadcasted prompted huge backlash on both the BBC which aired them, and UEFA, which filmed them. To continue to broadcast people in distress during such a terrifying event was a huge intrusion of privacy. BBC has apologised but said ‘in stadium’ coverage is controlled by UEFA. Whatever the case, they could have cut to the studio sooner. The most important thing is that Eriksen is alive and well. However both the BBC and UEFA film crews must ensure an incident like that is never broadcasted in such a disrespectful and intruding way again.

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