Chidlren's social mobility is being stumped - Katherine Lai

Former prime minister and Old Etonion, David Cameron Yui Mok/PA Wire
Former prime minister and Old Etonion, David Cameron Yui Mok/PA Wire

When the headteacher at a £12,000-a-term school compares the criticism of private schools to anti-semitism under the Nazis, you can’t help but think, ‘are you kidding me?’

Anthony Wallersteiner, head of Stowe, trivialised the persecution of Jewish people in a tasteless analogy. 

The David Camerons and Boris Johnsons of our country are being rightfully critiqued because they dominate Westminster and Oxbridge.

We’re highlighting the decline of social mobility under this government.

His whole schtick screams ‘oh poor rich victim me’, and reeks of ignorance.

No, Sir, you are not solely to blame. The entire education system is to blame.

I’m part of the guinea pig generation of pupils transitioning to the new 9-1 GCSE system.

If you’re a student, a teacher or a parent, I’m sure you understand how stressful it is to be thrown unaware into a sea of numbers which don’t actually mean anything when talking to those out of the loop.

My teacher told me that these GCSEs were hard for those aiming for the top grades and even harder for those wishing to just pass.

However, while the rest of us brave the climb, private schools can just opt out, take the IGCSEs and escape the new system.

And while funding is cut to schools and class sizes rise, they remain cosy in their small numbers.

Makes sense really.

After all, a £900 phone is better quality than a freebie.

But my education is not a mere transaction of goods.

When my politics teacher tells us most of the resources he provides us with are out of his own pocket, there is a serious problem.

 The stumping of social mobility is not an attitude or work-ethic problem but one of pure economics and a government which doesn’t seem to want to enable regular kids to succeed.

Katherine Lai is a student at Havant and Southdowns College