Gosport man who lost his leg after horror crash is moving on with his life after securing legal settlement

A CYCLIST who had a leg amputated after a horror crash has won a four-year legal battle and said: ‘My focus now is entirely on the future.’
Phil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured in 2018Phil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured in 2018
Phil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured in 2018

Phil Dyke, 71, was hit by a driver who only had a provisional licence – and so bad were his injuries that he had to have his leg amputated two years later.

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Phil was airlifted to Southampton General Hospital and underwent more than 15 operations over more than two years as doctors attempted to rebuild his right leg.

Phil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured with new puppy ArloPhil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured with new puppy Arlo
Phil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured with new puppy Arlo

However, despite their best efforts, he later required a below-the-knee amputation.

Now after his lawyers Irwin Mitchell secured him a settlement he can pay for specialist rehabilitation, therapies and adaptations to the home he shares with wife Tina, 57, and new puppy Arlo.

Former baker Phil, who had worked on board the Queen Elizabeth II cruise liner, is now able to resume his love of baking in his new adapted kitchen.

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Looking back on the physical and psychological effects of what happened, Phil said: ‘I was heading towards retirement when the incident occurred and it meant many of the plans that Tina and I had made went out of the window.’

Phil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured after returning to his love of baking in his specially adapted kitchenPhil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured after returning to his love of baking in his specially adapted kitchen
Phil Dyke, a Gosport cyclist whose life was turned upside down when he was hit by an unqualified driver and had his leg amputated, is looking to the future after a settlement has resulted in specialist adaptations to be made to his home. Pictured after returning to his love of baking in his specially adapted kitchen

He added: ‘However, our new-look home and getting Arlo have been a big moment for us and it feels like things are starting to look up once again.

‘Having an adapted property means I can do more things myself, which has really been a big boost to my confidence.

‘Nothing will change the past, but my focus now is entirely on the future.

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‘No matter how bad things get, things can get better. Losing a limb was devastating, but I’m determined to look forward now.’

Following the crash, the Ford Puma driver was found guilty of careless driving, not having a licence or insurance. He was banned for two years.

Claire Howard, serious injury expert at Irwin Mitchell said: ‘Phil and Tina have faced an incredibly challenging few years as a result of the collision, including receiving the devastating news that he would have to lose part of his right leg.

‘However, while his life has been turned upside down, Phil has always shown a huge amount of courage to try and look positively to the future.

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‘While nothing can make up for what has happened we are delighted that Phil is moving forward with his life and also hope that the adaptions made to his new home mean he can enjoy plenty of independence.

‘However, it is also vital the motorists are aware of the consequences that vulnerable road users such as cyclists can be left to face because of the careless actions of others.’

Phil is supporting Limb Loss Awareness Month.

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