Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth cancels visit to South Korea as North Korea rages about British warships' deployment

ROYAL Navy flagship HMS Queen Elizabeth has axed plans to visit South Korea amid the escalating coronavirus crisis in the country and deepening tensions with North Korea.

Thursday, 26th August 2021, 4:03 pm
Updated Thursday, 26th August 2021, 4:17 pm

The mighty aircraft carrier had planned to visit the Asian state’s southern city of Busan to carry out a series of joint defence events.

But South Korea is currently gripped in its latest wave of coronavirus, which has forced military chiefs to change course.

The decision follows a visit to the port by the Royal Navy’s Astute-class nuclear-powered submarine, HMS Artful, which arrived days before the £3.2bn aircraft carrier’s expected arrival.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

Pictured: HNLMS Evertsen approaches RFA Tidespring and HMS Queen Elizabeth to conduct a double replenishment at sea.

The move comes as Britain faces an outcry from North Korea over plans to deploy two Portsmouth-based warship to Asian waters in the coming weeks.

Read More

Read More
Flying Bull Academy announces death of ‘special’ headteacher who will ‘be sorely...

‘We've decided to cancel the port call given the coronavirus situation. Exchanges and other in-person events between the sailors will not take place. But some combined field maneuvers are likely to be staged as planned,’ a military source told the Yonhap News Agency.

A spokesman for the Ministry of Defence added the the wider programme of exercises at sea for the ship remain unchanged by the move.

UK, Netherlands, United States and Japan complete intensive joint exercises in the Pacific A powerhouse naval force of warships, aircraft, sailors and marines from the UK, the Netherlands, United States and Japan converged for milestone exercises in the Pacific Ocean. The UK Carrier Strike Group’s warships led by aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth worked with the USS America-led United States Expeditionary Strike Group 7 and two ships from Japan’s Maritime Self Defence Force to prove the ability of the navies to operate effectively together.

Last month saw infections in South Korea surge to their highest levels since the pandemic began, with 1,275 new cases recorded in a day.

The sudden spike is being blamed on the delta variant of the virus, which was first identified in India.

Despite the virus outbreak, plans are still set to go ahead for Queen Elizabeth and her task group to continue with maritime drills with South Korea and Japan.

Meanwhile, bitter military leaders from South Korea’s neighbour, North Korea have lashed out over the British task force’s presence in the region.

Pictured is HMS SPEY sailing for the first time out of Portsmouth as a fully-fledged member of the Overseas Patrol Squadron. The ship is due to deploy to the Pacific soon.

The secretive state launched a vitriolic attack after the UK government revealed plans to station two Portsmouth-based patrol ships in Asian waters.

HMS Spey and HMS Tamar are expected to depart Portsmouth for their new home in a matter of days. They are expected to remain there for several years.

However, officials from the North Korean Foreign Ministry blasted Whitehall, raging that the government should focus on Brexit rather than ‘restoring its declining status’.

In a statement, the ministry said: ‘The UK, which is intensifying the situation by pushing warships into the distant Asia-Pacific region, is using our “threat” as an excuse.’

Kim Jong-un's isolated nation accused Britain of trying to ‘restore its declining status’ but said its plan will only cause opposition from other countries.

The statement added: ‘It would be better for the UK to focus on the troublesome Brexit outcome rather than risking others unreasonably for the realisation of its political goals.’

Looking for the latest Royal Navy updates from Portsmouth? Join our new Royal Navy news Facebook group to keep up to date.

A message from the Editor, Mark Waldron

You can subscribe here for unlimited access to our online coverage, including Pompey, with 70 per cent fewer adverts for less than 20p a day.