Homes off Long Copse Lane between Emsworth and Westbourne set to get permission even though plan goes against Havant Borough Council's own planning rules

A nine-home development of new homes looks likely to be given planning permission – even though it goes against the council’s own rules.

By Toby Paine
Tuesday, 22nd February 2022, 4:32 pm
Updated Tuesday, 22nd February 2022, 4:34 pm

Havant Borough Council will decide on granting planning permission for nine homes on a greenfield site next to Long Copse Lane, between Emsworth and Westbourne.

The development will see a mixture of detached and semi-detached houses ranging from two to four bedrooms with garages and a new access and internal driveway.

The proposal has received 20 objections and six supporting comments from the public.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

Havant Borough Council will decide on granting planning permission for nine homes on a greenfield site next to Long Copse Lane, between Emsworth and Westbourne.

Read More

Read More
MP Caroline Dinenage hits out at plans to build hundreds of homes off Newgate La...

A spokesperson for Save Long Copse Lane, a campaign group said: ‘The proposals are contrary to Policy AL2 of the adopted Havant Local Plan (Allocations) 2014. As paragraph 2.09 of the Plan states: “Planning applications to develop land within an undeveloped gap will need to demonstrate clearly that the proposal will not undermine the separate identities of mainland settlements or result in their coalescence.”

‘Whilst not resulting in coalescence the proposals further undermine the separate identities of the two settlements. The proposals satisfy none of the criteria set out in the policy.’

Although the application is in conflict with the council’s own planning policies, officers have recommended granting permission due to the council falling short on its housing targets.

When a housing authority can’t provide a five-year housing supply, granting planning permission is encouraged unless the development is in a protected area or if the harm caused by the application outweighs the benefits.

The report states: ‘The site is not allocated for residential development. However, due to the lack of a five-year housing land supply, the policies which are most important for determining the application are out-of-date.

‘It is clear that the council will not be able to significantly boost its supply of homes and meet its housing needs without the development of currently unallocated greenfield sites beyond existing development boundaries.

‘Overall, it is considered that the conflict with the development plan as a whole is outweighed by other material considerations and it is recommended that conditional planning permission be granted.’

The decision to grant planning permission will be made at the council’s planning committee on Thursday.